Stock or Commodity Trading Content Most Interesting to you

What types of stock or commodity trading content is MOST interesting to you ? POLL

Take the poll... I want to know what type of content you are most interested in seeing. I have been trying to guess for a while, but I am going to put up this permanent poll to see what valued visitors are really looking for on this site.

I usually write quite a bit about the sp500, but maybe that is too boring?

Your feedback and submission of this poll is appreciated 🙂

If what you are interested in is not in the choices then select other and please enter a comment to the post saying what area most interests you...

[poll id="2"]

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9 comments on “Stock or Commodity Trading Content Most Interesting to you
  1. Austin says:

    One can never have enough S&P lol

  2. geoff says:

    Simply incredible – – you have presumably been quoting the cycle ramblings of Martin Armstrong who was just 11 years in jail for an alleged ponzi scheme. I copied and pasted the article below from Bloomberg. Is this the same Armstrong that you have been quoting ad nauseum with the famous June 13th date. If so, . . . God, i should have my head examined for wasting any time reading your blog! Just simply incredible if this is the same Armstrong. Care to comment? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

    Financier Martin Armstrong Released After 11 Years in Jail
    March 15, 2011, 6:46 PM EDT
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    By Zeke Faux and David Glovin

    (Updates with Armstrong statement in third paragraph.)

    March 15 (Bloomberg) — Financier Martin Armstrong, jailed since January 2000 on civil and criminal charges stemming from what prosecutors said was a $700 million Ponzi scheme, was released from prison last week.

    Armstrong, the founder of now-defunct Princeton Economics International Ltd., will be confined to his home until his time in federal custody ends in September, said Chris Burke, a spokesman for the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons. Armstrong is permitted to leave for work and will check in periodically at a halfway house in the Philadelphia area.

    “I would like to take the time to thank everyone who has stood by me these many years,” said a letter under Armstrong’s name posted on the website MartinArmstrong.org. “What I have seen is the deep corruption that lingers through the political- financial system that threatens the future of my family and friends.”

    Armstrong was jailed a record seven years for defying a judge’s order to produce gold bars, coins and other assets. His detention for contempt in a high-security Manhattan prison was the longest of its kind in a federal white-collar civil case. In 2006, Armstrong was sentenced to five more years in prison after pleading guilty to conspiracy in a related criminal case.

    He has repeatedly challenged his guilty plea.

    The former money manager built his reputation on his theory that economic cycles recur over centuries. His firm, which was based in Princeton, New Jersey, operated from an office overlooking Tokyo’s Imperial Palace and grew to manage as much as $3 billion.

    Japanese Investors

    Thomas Sjoblom, a lawyer who represented Armstrong when he was jailed for contempt, didn’t immediately respond to a phone call and e-mail seeking comment. Armstrong’s daughter didn’t immediately respond to an e-mailed request for comment.

    Armstrong was charged in 1999 with defrauding mostly Japanese investors out of more than $700 million. In December 2001, Republic Securities, now a unit of HSBC Holdings Plc, pleaded guilty to helping Armstrong swindle Japanese clients and paid $569 million, then the largest reimbursement by any corporation to investors victimized in a fraud.

    Two ex-Republic employees and a former Armstrong worker also pleaded guilty.

    In the civil case, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission sued Princeton Economics and Armstrong in 1999. The judge in that case jailed Armstrong in January 2000 for contempt after Armstrong refused to surrender $14.9 million in gold bars and rare coins.

    Violent Attack

    Armstrong said he didn’t have them to turn over.

    While in prison, Armstrong said he spent lengthy periods in isolation. A violent attack left him hospitalized in intensive care.

    Armstrong spent his first 7 1/2 years in a high-security federal detention center in Manhattan and the remainder of his sentence in a prison camp in New Jersey.

    The criminal case is U.S. v. Armstrong, 99-cr-997, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

    –Editors: Stephen Farr, Pierre Paulden.

    To contact the reporter on this story: Zeke Faux in New York at zfaux@bloomberg.net; David Glovin in Manhattan federal court at dglovin@bloomberg.net.

    To contact the editor responsible for this story: David Rovella at drovella@bloomberg.net.

  3. geoff says:

    Holy lizards – – – i am an idiot to be wasting any time whatsoever on reading this blogsite. My instincts and comments about a week ago seem to have more justification than i thought – – – my intense doubt of the June 13th date M. Armstrong date that this blog has repeatedly been flogging.

    When i googled Armstrong today, i encounter the following on Bloomberg (copied and pasted excerpts here)

    March 15 (Bloomberg) — Financier Martin Armstrong, jailed since January 2000 on civil and criminal charges stemming from what prosecutors said was a $700 million Ponzi scheme, was released from prison last week.

    Armstrong, the founder of now-defunct Princeton Economics International Ltd., will be confined to his home until his time in federal custody ends in September, said Chris Burke, a spokesman for the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons. Armstrong is permitted to leave for work and will check in periodically at a halfway house in the Philadelphia area.

    “I would like to take the time to thank everyone who has stood by me these many years,” said a letter under Armstrong’s name posted on the website MartinArmstrong.org. “What I have seen is the deep corruption that lingers through the political- financial system that threatens the future of my family and friends.”

    Tom, you “owe” your readers nothing, but they owe themselves taking the time to research who you are holding up as experts on the market. Holy Cow, if this is the same Armstrong, than I am flabbergasted. You stick to your June 13th obsession. Good luck to you and all that follow you!

  4. Tom Tom says:

    I am not forcing you to read my blog. If you think that this is such a big issue, then you are free to make whatever choice you wish to.

  5. Tom Tom says:

    Yes Austin, but lately the S&P is so boring…. we need volatility to come into style again..

  6. RMT says:

    Tom,
    Keep up the good work. I find your articles to be very insightful and I really enjoy reading them. I would like to see more analysis on large cap and cyclical stocks like XOM, X, MT, FCX, etc. Maybe sometime down the road, you could conduct video tutorials or webinars to teach some your technical analysis methods.

  7. geoff says:

    RMT

    “yes” by all means some seminars on the “Cheetah” system! or since Tom, by earlier comment, indicates that he believes that the M Armstrong model is the best model ever devised, than, by all means a seminar on the Armstrong model and the significance of what happened on June 13th, 2011. please bring on the seminars, particularly the latter / Armstrong seminar and the learnings / “take-aways” that we should all learn from the upcoming June 13th.

  8. RMT says:

    Geoff,
    Man you need to calm down. June 13 date is just “one more” thing to be aware of. Nobody is telling you to short the market and trade off that date. Its always good to be aware of what could potentially happen. I’ve been following a potential bearish M-A pattern on the monthly for a while now. I’ve been reading about various articles on elliot wave cycles that predicts the bull run to continue for another few years. My point is that its good to be aware of all these things; it doesn’t mean you necessarily trade off them. Market is difficult man, if it was easy, every chump on the street would be making millions. I’ll admit that the cheetah system got of to a bad start. But I made money shorting when Tom issued that Bot Short signal. He’s been right on several other swing calls as well. As a trader the more perspectives I get, the better decision I can make. This site is one of several that I follow. So don’t make snarky comments about my webinar idea. It’s just a food for thought for Tom. I’ll always be a student of the market and I’m always game to learn new things.

  9. geoff says:

    RMT

    i agree. the more perspectives the better. i would, in fact, be interested in listening to an explanation of Armstrong method since to date, the explanation here has been limited to none. and particularly since Tom considers this method the best ever devised!

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